A Strange Pagan Tale to Tell Your Great Grandchildren

Cross, Crescent, and Sickle | Credit : Patrick Lutherer

Once upon a time, there were three vultures, feeding on human misery.

The first one was named Cross.

The second one was named Crescent.

The third one was named Sickle.

But did they drink water ?

No, they didn’t.

They used to drink the flood of excuses of the rich for letting misery exist.

The poor, on their part, believed Cross, Crescent and Sickle were their holy benefactors, since they were eating their misery and letting them feel less miserable.

But in fact, they were even more miserable.

From time to time, one of the vultures ate a child. Each time the vultures ate their progeny, the poor fought each other to determine who was the responsible for the murder.

But they could never get along to punish the vultures.

When it was the fault of Cross, it wasn’t the fault of Crescent or Sickle.

When it was the fault of Crescent, it wasn’t the fault of Cross and Sickle.

When it was the fault of Sickle, it wasn’t the fault of Cross and Crescent.

You certainly can’t punish every three of the vulture for the sin of a single, can you ?

The poor were infighting and were only hurting themselves. So they learned to be pacific : they had lots of children, and they felt better when the vultures got them rid of the weight of misery.

Forgiving the vultures every time even allowed them to feel less powerless.

Being resentless allowed them to feel great despite their poverty.

In addition, Cross, Crescent, and Sickle were also fighting and disputing every piece of human misery. It looked like they were not friends at all, and could never get along. When it was the fault of one of them, it could not be the fault of the others.

So nobody chased them.

Yet, every time somebody tried to punish one of them, the two others saved him and ate the revengeful.

One day, a group of wealthy notables, who did not like vultures at all, decided to stop giving the ugly vultures excuses to drink from their palace. They did not even start trying to help the poor, but they stop finding excuses for not doing so.

With no more excuses for letting the poor live in misery, the three vultures became very thirsty and irritated. So they attacked the poor.

The poor fought back the cursed birds and decided to ban them definitely from their land. They recovered their pride : they were poor, but now they had enough pride to stop sharing their misery to the vultures. From this moment, no more of their children were harmed.

The poor began rehumanizing. The rich had a better life since they did not pass any more time finding excuses for not helping the poor. So they decided to begin helping the poor, for real.

Cross, Crescent, and Sickle were doomed : they had no more misery to eat and no more excuse to drink.

With no more excuse to drink and no misery to eat, the three scavengers starved to death.

This tale will be told to children, generation after generation, to explain how two criminal religions, and their secularised metastasis, took the world hostage, and then died.

Every resemblance to real-life rice bags, living or dead, is purely coincidental.

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Yann Meridex

Yann Meridex

Polyist political pagan 🦉🏛🕯️ Husband of @SolveigMineo 🌹 Liberty, Progress, Hedonism 🌍 Occident is the West decolonizing itself from christianity ✨